Tag Archives: slow preformance

Use clean boot to troubleshoot performance issues in Windows 10

>> Hi. My name is Bryan with Microsoft customer support. Today, I’m going to show you how to identify software-related problems for your Windows PC. We’re going to explain what a clean boot does, how to narrow down the problem, and how put it all back together again. Let’s get started. So what is a clean boot? Clean boot is a troubleshooting step that loads the operating system without all the extra applications and services that are installed in your device. If your problems such as slow performance or crash goes away after performing a clean boot, then you know you have a software problem with one of the applications or services installed. We’re going to use BadApp to represent any problem that you might be having on your device whether it be a crash or a particular error message. To do a clean boot, we’re going to use the “System Configuration Manager” or the tool commonly referred to as “msconfig.” First, we’re going to open up the “Services” tab and stop all unnecessary services.

To do this, we’re going to “Hide all the Microsoft Services” and then uncheck any of the remaining services. Next, we’re going to disable all the startup apps. Startup applications are loaded every time you start the computer. To disable these, we’ll be using Task Manager. When you’re done disabling all the services and startup apps, you’ll need to “Reboot” for the changes to take. Once your computer has restarted, you’re now in a clean boot state. When you’re in this state, you’ll want to check to see if the problem you have is still there. So that means, your application was running slow, shutting down, or crashing. Watch it again and see if there’s a difference. If everything is working as it was before, then you just confirmed that one of the things that you disable in the clean boot is causing the problem.

The next step is to figure out what is causing the problem. We’re going to start with re-enabling the apps. If you have a lot of apps in your startup, then you can enable half of them at a time to see if the problem is in that batch of apps. And depending on how many apps you have, you may have to do this several times.

Let’s reboot to see if any of the apps we’ve re-enabled is causing the problem. After enabling the first batch of apps, everything still looks good. Let’s narrow this down further by enabling the next half batch of apps. In this case, it looks like one of the apps we re-enabled is causing the problem. Let’s single out and disable the perm called BadApp and see what happens. After restarting, the problem has disappeared. Now that we’ve narrowed it down to a specific app, you can check the vendor website to see if there’s an updated version of the app to install or you can uninstall the app either with “Apps and Features” in Settings, or in the Control Panel “Programs and Features.” But for this demonstration, it’s just a bad app that we don’t use and we’re just going to delete it from the startup location we had placed it in. At this point, we found the bad app that’s caused the problem. We’re going to put everything back to normal by re-enabling all the rest of the startup apps and services.

If you don’t undo these steps, then you might break something else by not turning the apps and services back on. Now, what if you didn’t find the problem with apps in the startup area? Then, you would have continue the elimination process by turning everything on in the startup folder and then use the same elimination process to narrow down the problem in the services section. We hope this walk through of the clean boot troubleshooting will help you identify any potential software-related problems in case you have a problem with your device. If you enjoyed this video, please click the like button and subscribe to our channel for more. .

As found on Youtube